Fort Horsted Ghost Hunt

Primrose close, Chatham, Kent

Ghost hunt photo fort horsted chatham kent

Work started on Fort Horsted in 1880 to defend the Untited Kingdom against the threat of the French and the growing power of imperial Germany.

The Fort was to provide defence to the eastern flank and Chatham Dockyard, home of the new iron-clad warships.

The construction of 5 forts situated at Darland, Twydall, Luton, Horsted and Bridgewoods were set to be constructed based on military opinion on the usefulness of fixed fortifications was divided possibly leading to the forts becoming known as Palmerston’s follies after the Prime Minister of the day Lord Palmerston.

Fort Horsted, named after Horsa, a saxon king and by far the largest of the five, in 1880 using a convict labour force from the newly constructed Borstal prison and supervised by the Royal Engineers.

Completed by 1889 its its role of providing a garrison, munitions store and water supply top up to Forts Luton and Bridgewoods began.   On the 1st July 1907 the Forts were put to the test proving that the forts were not impregnable with both Luton and Bridgewoods falling by 2nd August.

In WWI and WWII the fort remained in military hand with the Royal Ordnance Corps and The Royal Artillery although much of the activities is covered by the official secret act.

With so much history there is no surprise there has been a large amount of ghost sighting over the years 

Shaddow figures, the spirit of a little girl and even a phantom dog are just a number of the reports, you just have to join us on what is sure to be an interesting night.

Reported Paranormal Activity

With so much history there is no surprise there has been a large amount of ghost sighting over the years 

Shaddow figures, the spirit of a little girl and even a phantom dog are just a number of the reports,

 

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