Ghost Hunting Events

Southern Ghost Society, ghost hunts and paranormal experience events we have planned.

These events are available to anyone over the age of 16. Being a society, booking priority is given to our members, so why not register now and be advised in advance of all our new events.

Registration is free and membership to the Southern Ghost Society is also free. We do have to make a charge to cover the costs of arranging the events. This charge is on a per person basis and is fully inclusive unless otherwise stated. Prices and full details are only available to registered members.

   
 
  Date Location Availability
Ghost hunting event photo Secret Location 01 March 2019 Secret Location

Don't miss this opportunity to join us on an investigation at a venue exclusive to Southern Ghost Society.

This Venue originally opened in 1870 as part of the huge Military Hospital and was a dedicated asylum facility for military personnel who were believed to be suffering from mental illness. Its construction was in response to the Lunacy Act of 1845 which stated that the mad could be brought back to sanity?. It is now known that the psychiatric conditions being treated were, most likely, shellshock or PTSD, however, at the time, this illness was not well understood and treatment was, by modern standards, highly experimental and often extremely cruel, leading to a significant number of suicides and escape attempts by patients.

The nature of the building and the perceived risk to the local community from patients explains its location in the far corner of the hospital complex, the high walls around the House and the fact that the original windows could only be opened a few inches. Inside, the apparently light and spacious design disguised padded cells and heavy prison-like doors. The House initially treated patients from the Crimean War and demand soared during WW1 as a result of the emergence of shellshock requiring temporary extensions to be built. Treatment in what was known as D block included rest, hypnotism and electric shock treatment. Suspicion that patients were cowards faking illness to escape warfare were fuelled by Sunday enforced marches with local people viewing them as cowards.

Southern Ghost Society is delighted to be able to offer an opportunity to conduct a paranormal investigation at this amazing location. Our initial ghost hunt revealed a magnitude of apparently paranormal activity, including shadowy figures, unexplained sounds of footsteps and voices when there was no-one there, sudden drops in temperature, lights switching on and off, superb sťances with contact being made with former patients?

To find out more please become a member and email the team........Please note, this venue is exclusive to Southern Ghost Society and its members
SOLD OUT

Ghost hunting event photo Preston Manor 09 March 2019 Preston Manor
Preston Drove, Hove, Brighton BN1 6SD
Preston Manor has a long-established reputation as a site of paranormal activity, and it has been described as one of Britain's most haunted houses. Ghosts allegedly seen since the 19th century include a grey-clad woman, a blonde woman who revealed herself to be an excommunicated nun, a floating hand and a toy tractor-riding phantom.

The blonde nun (often called 'The White Lady') is the earliest and most famous purported ghost: first mentioned in the 16th century, the frequency of its appearance peaked at the end of the 19th century, and it was last recorded in 1903. One of Eleanor Stanford's children from her second marriage, already familiar with the descriptions of the ghost, encountered it in 1896, walking from the drawing room to the staircase. The apparition disappeared when the child tried to touch it. Soon afterwards, another daughter apparently saw the same figure at the top of the stairs.

Later in 1896, a friend of the Stanford family, who was staying at Preston Manor in the hope of seeing the White Lady, encountered it in the entrance hall. The man found out (supposedly through talking to the ghost) that it was the spirit of a nun who had been excommunicated and buried on unconsecrated land. More details including that there were two ghosts, both of whom were nuns who had been excommunicated in about 1535 by a friar, even though one had done no wrong emerged at a sťance held in late 1896.

Early in 1897, the skeleton of a middle-aged woman, whose remains were dated to the 16th century by a doctor, was found behind the house during building work; it was secretly buried on consecrated ground in St Peter's churchyard, with help from the Stanford family. A s??ance held in 1898 reputedly made contact with the now pacified spirits, and only two more sightings occurred of a spirit with the characteristic long fair hair: both in 1903, once in a billiard room and once in a bedroom. White-clad female spirits were also reported by passers-by in 1976 and 1992 in the grounds of the manor, though.

The same daughter who allegedly saw the ghost on the staircase also reported seeing two phantom men apparently fighting on another staircase on the southwest side earlier in the 19th century.Early in the 20th century, she also reported an 'immensely evil' presence in the southwest bedroom, moving around the room and then leaning over the bed. In the same room, a visitor to the house once observed a floating hand, not attached to any arm, attaching itself to her four-poster bed and moving up and down it. Another visitor later reported an identical experience, and also reported that the bed seemed to be shaking during the encounter. The southwest side of the building was apparently a focus for paranormal activity: strange noises, objects being moved, dresses being cut with regular patterns of holes, and doors opening and shutting were all reported there.

A grey-clad female ghost was reported several times throughout the 20th century. Reputed sightings included one in the boiler room of the house, early in the 20th century; two in quick succession by a World War II fire watcher, first on the main staircase then on the parapet of the roof; and one by a security guard. Another security guard reported a ghost in old-fashioned black clothing walking across a landing in the 1990s.

We would love you to join us on this exciting paranormal investigation, through which we can gain an insight into past times and, with the help of the ghosts of those who still frequent the site, relive the spirit of Preston Manor.
Selling Fast

Ghost hunting event photo Nothe Fort 16 March 2019 Nothe Fort
Barrack Road Weymouth Dorset DT4 8UF
Imagine a labyrinth of underground passageways dating back to 1872 and steeped in decades of military history. Amongst all the superb memorabilia, it is no surprise that this incredible location also plays host to a significant number of ghosts and spirits who still haunt its present.

For years, people have reported the paranormal activity of the Whistling Gunner in the passageways. Is this resident ghost responsible for the spooky and unexplained sounds of steam train whistles or air raid sirens ?

What causes the doors to bang or the tapping frequently heard in the passageways and which spirits still speak softly in the dark ?

A white figure has been seen on the parapet and up to 5 ghosts walk along the terraces. Could these be the manifestation of people who died in an accident so many years ago ?

We are delighted to offer a paranormal night to remember at Nothe Fort in Weymouth. Can our ghost hunting investigation reveal the truth behind activities which other ghost hunts
have been unable to explain.
A Few Remaining

Ghost hunting event photo Fort Widley 13 April 2019 Fort Widley
Portsdown Hill Rd, Portsmouth PO6 3LS
The impressive and imposing Fort Widley was built between 1861 and 1870 to defend against invasion, but do the spirits of those who reportedly haunt this atmospheric site still find protection within its walls?

Fort Widley, part of the group of Forts on Portsdown Hill named after the then Prime Minister Lord Palmerston, was constructed in response to the potential danger of attacks on the Portsmouth Dockyards by the French, either by sea or by land approaching from the north after landing along the coast. By the time this immensely expensive project was completed, the threat of attack had passed, armament design had improved and the site consequently became known as Palmerston's Follies.

The Fort, which is encircled by a dry moat, has a central parade ground and it is via a spiral staircase from here that access is gained to the amazing four underground tunnels leading to the gun batteries, barracks and vaulted main magazine which could house 2500 barrels of gun powder. It is within these intriguing tunnels that most of the reported paranormal activity has been experienced. Will our ghost hunt awaken the spirits and uncover the truth behind the hearing of whispered voices, or the throwing of stones by unseen forces, or will we hear the running steps of a young drummer boy said to have fallen to his death down the spiral staircase whilst being chased through the tunnels by an Officer seeking to administer punishment.

Soldiers of the Royal Artillery were barracked at Fort Widley between its initial decommissioning and 1939. The Fort then became a Royal Engineers? Bomb Disposal base and, during WW2, it was used to hold prisoners of war. Perhaps it is the ghost of one of these prisoners whose footsteps or knocking can be heard on the Fort Keep, or has a whistling former Sergeant Major come out of the Mess for a nightly stroll?

This amazing military site which has seen decades of history right through from the 1860s to its conversion to a control centre against nuclear attack up to the end of the Cold War, is a perfect location for our paranormal investigation. Join us on this ghost hunt and, as well as the fantastic views of Portsmouth and the surrounding area, perhaps we will also have the pleasure of seeing our torch lights being joined by the lanterns seen to be carried by the spirits which still inhabit this setting.
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Ghost hunting event photo Shepton Mallet Prison 26 April 2019 Shepton Mallet Prison
HMP Shepton Mallet Shepton Mallet??Somerset BA4 5LU.
The Southern Ghost Society team's next big prison adventure takes you to the infamous Cornhill, HMP Shepton Mallet and we are giving you the opportunity to join the us as we attempt to uncover what now lies in this abandoned Category C penitentiary.

Built in 1610, this grade II listed prison offers over 400 years of dark history making Cornhill the oldest jail in the country. In the 1600, the former house of correction would have offered very little in the way of sanitation which would have led to the spread of Smallpox as well as other deadly diseases. Once these diseases took hold, many would have died a painful death and due to the infections and the worry of further spread, many would have been buried around the prison yard in unmarked graves.

Moving forward in history, your jail time would have not got any easier in fact conditions were said to be at its most brutal. In 1823, inmates would have been subject to hard labour in the form of a Treadwheel. Time at the Treadwell was gruelling as men would be made to tread the wheel for countless hours taking them to breaking point.
Cornhill was used as the main site for executions in the county of Somerset between the years of 1889 and 1926 and although the exact number of deaths by this method is unknown, it is thought that countless men and women lost their lives.

In the Second World War, the prison was taken over by British and Americans troops and by the end of 1944, it is said that 16 Americans were hanged and 2 were executed by firing squads for crimes that included rape and murder. The British military used the prison, specifically cell 10 to house and protect many important historical documents. It has been said that in its time the room was home to Lord Nelsons logbook from the HMS Victory, the Doomsday Book, a copy of the Magna Carter and even a signed agreement by Neville Chamberlain and Hitler himself.

A white woman apparition has been report wandering the now empty labyrinth of hallways and cells. In recent times staff of the prison have reported seeing Ghostly American Servicemen wandering aimlessly as they would have done when they were stationed here.

Executions, death, torture, pain and suffering, With all this history it is not a surprise that countless storries of paranormal activity have been reported through the years.

Join Us
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Ghost hunting event photo Fort Widley 10 May 2019 Fort Widley
Portsdown Hill Rd, Portsmouth PO6 3LS
The impressive and imposing Fort Widley was built between 1861 and 1870 to defend against invasion, but do the spirits of those who reportedly haunt this atmospheric site still find protection within its walls?

Fort Widley, part of the group of Forts on Portsdown Hill named after the then Prime Minister Lord Palmerston, was constructed in response to the potential danger of attacks on the Portsmouth Dockyards by the French, either by sea or by land approaching from the north after landing along the coast. By the time this immensely expensive project was completed, the threat of attack had passed, armament design had improved and the site consequently became known as Palmerston's Follies.

The Fort, which is encircled by a dry moat, has a central parade ground and it is via a spiral staircase from here that access is gained to the amazing four underground tunnels leading to the gun batteries, barracks and vaulted main magazine which could house 2500 barrels of gun powder. It is within these intriguing tunnels that most of the reported paranormal activity has been experienced. Will our ghost hunt awaken the spirits and uncover the truth behind the hearing of whispered voices, or the throwing of stones by unseen forces, or will we hear the running steps of a young drummer boy said to have fallen to his death down the spiral staircase whilst being chased through the tunnels by an Officer seeking to administer punishment.

Soldiers of the Royal Artillery were barracked at Fort Widley between its initial decommissioning and 1939. The Fort then became a Royal Engineers? Bomb Disposal base and, during WW2, it was used to hold prisoners of war. Perhaps it is the ghost of one of these prisoners whose footsteps or knocking can be heard on the Fort Keep, or has a whistling former Sergeant Major come out of the Mess for a nightly stroll?

This amazing military site which has seen decades of history right through from the 1860s to its conversion to a control centre against nuclear attack up to the end of the Cold War, is a perfect location for our paranormal investigation. Join us on this ghost hunt and, as well as the fantastic views of Portsmouth and the surrounding area, perhaps we will also have the pleasure of seeing our torch lights being joined by the lanterns seen to be carried by the spirits which still inhabit this setting.
Book Now

Ghost hunting event photo Fort Widley 06 July 2019 Fort Widley
Peter Ashley Activity Centre Portsdown Hill Road Cosham Portsmouth, PO6 3LS
The impressive and imposing Fort Widley was built between 1861 and 1870 to defend against invasion, but do the spirits of those who reportedly haunt this atmospheric site still find protection within its walls?

Fort Widley, part of the group of Forts on Portsdown Hill named after the then Prime Minister Lord Palmerston, was constructed in response to the potential danger of attacks on the Portsmouth Dockyards by the French, either by sea or by land approaching from the north after landing along the coast. By the time this immensely expensive project was completed, the threat of attack had passed, armament design had improved and the site consequently became known as Palmerston's Follies.

The Fort, which is encircled by a dry moat, has a central parade ground and it is via a spiral staircase from here that access is gained to the amazing four underground tunnels leading to the gun batteries, barracks and vaulted main magazine which could house 2500 barrels of gun powder. It is within these intriguing tunnels that most of the reported paranormal activity has been experienced. Will our ghost hunt awaken the spirits and uncover the truth behind the hearing of whispered voices, or the throwing of stones by unseen forces, or will we hear the running steps of a young drummer boy said to have fallen to his death down the spiral staircase whilst being chased through the tunnels by an Officer seeking to administer punishment.

Soldiers of the Royal Artillery were barracked at Fort Widley between its initial decommissioning and 1939. The Fort then became a Royal Engineers? Bomb Disposal base and, during WW2, it was used to hold prisoners of war. Perhaps it is the ghost of one of these prisoners whose footsteps or knocking can be heard on the Fort Keep, or has a whistling former Sergeant Major come out of the Mess for a nightly stroll?

This amazing military site which has seen decades of history right through from the 1860s to its conversion to a control centre against nuclear attack up to the end of the Cold War, is a perfect location for our paranormal investigation. Join us on this ghost hunt and, as well as the fantastic views of Portsmouth and the surrounding area, perhaps we will also have the pleasure of seeing our torch lights being joined by the lanterns seen to be carried by the spirits which still inhabit this setting.
Book Now

Ghost hunting event photo Galleries Of Justice 13 July 2019 Galleries Of Justice
The Lace Market Nottingham NG1 1HN
A Saxon settlement sat on the grounds of the Galleries of Justice since 600AD, The period known as the dark ages. Although there is no confirmation that the site was used for justice, Archaeologists have already unearthed some links to imprisonment and punishment.

Moving forward in history to 1125AD, The Normans appointed a sheriff to collect taxes and have said to have located him on this site. Although there is no evidence that this is true, the site was known as Sheriffs Hall.

Two Sheriffs linked to the local area were Gerard de Atia and Philip Marc. Both barbaric in their own right were known to use all manor of underhanded tactics to line their own pockets. Held with such fear and despise, they were even mentioned in Magna Carta.

Two pivotal dates in the sites history give us the first real evidence of the sites dark history. 1375AD is when it was first documented as a court room and 1449AD as a prison.

Early in the 17th Century the building was in dire need of refurbishment which was over looked until 1724AD when the courtroom floor collapsed leaving a shocked judge looking as as solicitors, jury, public and the accused all went crashing in to the cellars. After Squabbling it eventually got some attention in 1770AD which is the building you still see today.

When the Victorians overhauled the prison system, The gaol was closed due to its appalling conditions and it lay empty from 1878 until 1995.

Hangings, Torture and punishment would have been what awaited you during your time here and due to the conditions and treatment, Hanging may have been your best option.

Our nights investigation will see us spend the night in the famous Court rooms, caves and even the Condemned mans Cell where many a guilty prisoner spent their last few hours awaiting the end.

With Dark shadow figures, The touch of unseen hands and the feeling of dread to all who visit
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Planned Ghost Hunting Events

In addition to our confirmed ghost hunting events we have penciled in the following preliminary investigation locations. So don't forget to bookmark this page Click here to bookmark these events! and return soon for confirmed dates. Southern Ghost Society members are emailed as soon as new events are confirmed another good reason to join us.
 
     
Ghost hunting event photo Woodchester Mansion Woodchester Mansion

The Grade 1 listed Woodchster Mansion, located in the beautiful Cotswolds in Gloucestershire, is absolutely unique in that its construction was never completed Will our ghost hunt help reconstruct the past through the spirits, who may still haunt this magnificent location ?

Building of this superb Gothic building with its stone vaulted ceilings, gargoyles, grand staircase and impressive chapel was started in the1850s. Will the ghosts of any of the 7 workmen who died, 6 from accidents and 1 from a reported murder, return, through our presence, to reclaim their tools which still remain on the site ?

Can we verify reports of a headless horseman said to ride in the grounds and to be the apparition of Sir Rupert de Lansigny who killed his cousin to inherit the large park and the former house demolished to enable construction of the current Mansion ? What happened to the spirit of the Dominican Monk who drowned himself in one of the park lakes and who is the man seen walking along the corridor to the Chapel, but never entering that room or the shadow of a man staring up at the stained glass windows ? Most intriguingly, are the reported sightings of a black dog wandering through the Mansion the ghostly representation of those linked to the building ?

Join us on a paranormal investigation night to remember as we go back in time at Woodchester Mansion and seek to uncover the truth behind the ghostly hosts of our visit.

Ghost hunting event photo Royal Victoria Country Park Royal Victoria Country Park

The Royal Victoria Military Hospital, or Netley Hospital was a large military hospital in Netley, near Southampton, Hampshire, England. Construction started in 1856 at the suggestion of Queen Victoria but its design caused some controversy, chiefly from Florence Nightingale. Often visited by Queen Victoria, the hospital was extensively used during the First World War.

It became the 28th US General Hospital from 1944 to 1945 during the Invasion of Europe. The main building - the world's longest building when it was completed - was entirely demolished in 1966, except for the chapel and former YMCA building which are both still standing. The extensive outbuildings, which once occupied a vast acreage of land to the rear of the main building, finally succumbed in 1978. The site of the hospital can be seen and explored in Royal Victoria Country Park.

Ghost hunting event photo Explosion Museum at Priddy's Hard Explosion Museum at Priddy's Hard

We are delighted to announce a further event, this time at the magnificent Explosion ! The Museum of Naval Firepower, based within 18th century buildings at the Royal Navy's former armaments depot of Priddy's Hard, in Gosport.

Since its completion in 1756, this depot has played an active part in conflicts from the Napoleonic Wars right through to the Falklands War. Just imagine the experiences of the thousands who worked (and died) in such a dangerous environment.

What caused the explosion which killed 27 people ? To whom do the ghostly footsteps belong and why is this person knocking on the door ? What causes a heavy chain to swing for no apparent reason and is the reported unnatural gust of wind really the spirit of a labourer who died at the scene ? Will we witness the manifestation of Edward George McBride on the exact same spot where he was killed nearly 90 years ago ?

So many reported paranormal experiences, which surely merits further investigation. We'd love you to join us for what is certain to be a fabulous Ghost Hunt night

We will have the pleasure of exploring this historical site away from the usual visiting crowds the only company we may have is from the past !

Ghost hunting event photo The Rifles Museum The Rifles Museum

The Royal Berkshire Regiment, with its Museum in Brock Barracks, Oxford Road, Reading, and The Wiltshire Regiment, whose Museum was in Le Marchant Barracks, London Road, Devizes, merged in 1959 to become the Duke of Edinburgh's Royal Regiment (Berkshire and Wiltshire). However the two Museums continued on their separate sites for a number of years.

n the 1970s a new united site for both Regimental Headquarters and Museum Official Opening was sought in Salisbury. The Wardrobe, at first rejected on the grounds of the expense of conversion, was eventually selected and a 99 year lease was purchased from the Dean & Chapter of Salisbury Cathedral. The Duke of Edinburgh's Royal Regiment Museum was officially opened by HRH Prince Philip, The Duke of Edinburgh, Colonel-in-Chief of the Regiment, on 29 July 1982. As part of a program to widen the appeal of the Museum the name "Redcoats in the Wardrobe" was adopted in 1991.

In 1994 the Duke of Edinburgh's Royal Regiment amalgamated with the Gloucestershire Regiment to form the Royal Gloucestershire, Berkshire and Wiltshire Regiment. The Museum changed its name to reflect this, becoming the Royal Gloucestershire, Berkshire and Wiltshire Regiment (Salisbury) Museum. The Museum was (and is) only concerned with the Berkshire and Wiltshire elements, the collection and archives of the Gloucestershire Regiment are housed in the Soldiers of Gloucestershire Museum, Custom House, Gloucester GL1 2HE.

Ghost hunting event photo Valentines Mansions Valentines Mansions

Valentines Mansion is more than 300 years old.

The house was built in around 1696 for Elizabeth Tillotson and her family, after the death of her husband, the Archbishop of Canterbury.

At that time the new brick house stood in open countryside, several miles from the edge of London.
Valentines has changed hands many times since then. City merchant and banker Robert Surman bought the estate in 1720s and created the walled gardens, dovecote and grottoes.
In the 1760s owner Sir Charles Raymond spent part of his fortune renovating Valentines, giving the house its Georgian appearance.

Sarah Ingleby, the last private resident of Valentines, died in 1906 and the Council acquired the house in 1912. Since then, the mansion has been home to wartime refugees, a hospital, a public health centre, and a council housing department.

After standing empty for 15 years, Valentines has now been restored with Redbridge council and Heritage Lottery funds, and strong community support to create the historic but contemporary venue it is today.

Ghost hunting event photo Kelvedon Hatch Kelvedon Hatch

Come and witness the three lives of the bunker starting with its role as an RAF ROTOR Station, then a brief period as a civil defence centre through to its most recent life as a Regional Government HQ. Designed for up to 600 military and civilian personnel, possibly even the Prime Minister, their collective task being to organise the survival of the population in the awful aftermath of a nuclear war.

The Bunker had three main lives. Initially as an RAF ROTOR Station and latterly a Regional Government Headquarters, with a brief period in the 1960's as a civil defence centre. There were also spare bunk beds in the tunnel, to help accommodate some of the hundreds of civilian and military personnel that would be stationed here in time of nuclear attack. The bunker was built on land requisitioned from the local farmer J.A.Parrish.

Paradoxically as the heat of the Cold War died down, the bunker and it's ancillary systems were no longer required by the Government, and were costing up to 3 million pounds a year to keep on standby. Upon decommissioning in 1992 the bunker was bought back from the government by the Parrish family, at a closed bid public auction, and hence is now privately owned.