Smethwick Baths Ghost Hunt

Thimblemill Rd, Smethwick.

Smethwick BathsOpened on the 30th March 1933, Smethwick swimming Centre has gone through many interesting changes throughout the years and had famous faces pass through its doors and not only survived but participated in history.

Formally known as Thimblemill, the baths were designed by Chester Button and Roland Fletcher whose inspiration came from a high arched roof of aircraft hangers in France. Other similar designs can also be found at the Royal Horticultural Hall in London.

What make this an amazing venue to hold a paranormal investigation with its vast history and many uses over time primarily In World War 2 when the baths was used for a very different reason than recreation!


The labyrinth of subways and cellars were used as air raid shelters, equipment repairs and there is even a room which leads off the subways used as a morgue for local’s caught in bombings. Posters from the war period can still be seen today in the subways along with drawings on the wall.

On the site of the now Thimblemill Library sat U.S.A.A.F station 522 which house American Troops. An unlikely place for a U.S Air Force base but it was thought to be a good site for a supply depot and it situation also being good for movement of supplies.

More Exciting time lie ahead for the baths as after World War 2, for two seasons (April to September) it would be used for public swimming. Once that season was finished it took 2 days to drain ready for its new purpose. The pool would be covered with an amazing sprung maple floor ready for such events as hair dressing, dancing and boxing.

Swinging into the 60’s the baths saw the famous comedian Tommy Cooper also made an appearance and famous DJ Pete Waterman also had an embarrassing moment when entering the baths to do a gig. During the 60’s the baths still continued to hold dances with Smethwick getting a poor reputation for being one of the rougher dance halls with regular fighting and a famous riot in 1967 where fighting spilled out onto Thimblemill Road and the late bus nearly turned over.

Despite the poor reputation, stars continued to use the venue to host and in 1962 one of the most famous bands in the world the Beatles came to town. On Monday 19th November the boys came to town after doing an 85 mile dash down south from a gig in Liverpool at the cavern Club, then the Adelphi Ballroom in West Bromwich and finishing at Thimblemill.

The impressive list continued with The Rolling Stones performing in 1964,The kinks in 1965, The Small Faces in 1966 and even The Who in 1966.

In the late 60’s it was decided due to the unfortunate on going bad reputation for trouble the concerts and dances were stopped. As the famous faces stopped coming the baths attention seemed to be turned to the building itself as in 1968 the small pool was opened.

Reported Paranormal Activity

With so much history, countless uses and former famous host, Smethwick Baths is an ideal place to host a Paranormal Ghost investigation. Will you see the strange occurrence reported by members of staff who claim to find pyramids of stones built on the floor or encounter the group of ghostly children, thought to be mischievously running through the old air raid shelters?

With reports of Disembodied Voice, Footsteps and even Full Bodied Manifestation.

 

 

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